NANA YAW BOADU IV

NANA YAW BOADU IV

KYIDOMHENE / ACTING PRESIDENT

Phone: (123) 456-7890
Email: akwamu@easternchiefs.org

  • HISTORY
  • REGAL LIST
  • GAZARTED AND NON GAZARTED CHIEFS
  • The Akwamus like most Akans also migrated from Bono Manso to settle at the Twifo-Heman forest at the later part of the 16th century. This group of Akans belonged to the Aduana family and are blood brothers of Asumennya, Dormaa and Kumawu.” The following Paramount Chiefs are all members of the larger Aduana Clan: Akwamu, Dormaa, Kumawu, Asumeja, Asamankes, According to oral tradition it was as a result of succession dispute that compelled Otomfuo (brass-smith) Asare to desert the family to form a new state or city called Asaremankesee- Asares big state. The modern city of Asaamankese was originally founded and occupied by the Akwamus.

    In the olden days, when the Denkyiras were tormentors of the weak or small states such as the Asantes, it was the Akwamus who propped up Osei Tutu with the help of Okomfo Anokye to liberate these Asante states. The consequence was the formation of the Asante Kingdom under King Osei Tutu. To keep the young Asante Kingdom from unwarranted attacks and harassment from other tribes as well as to consolidate and entrench Osei Tutu’s authority, the Akwamus left a contingent of warriors to keep guard. Those Akwamus settled in Batama, Adum and Asafo. The Akwamus so distinguished themselves in the art of Chieftancy and warfare to the admiration of King Osei Tutu and his elders that they were honoured by creating Black Stools for them. Thus, Asafohene was made the Akwamuhene of Kumasi; Bantamahene made the Krontihene of Kumasi and Adumhene made Banmuhene of Kumasi. These positions still exist today. Other Akan tribes also followed suit and created the Akwamuhene position in their various states. That is why in every Akan town, we have an Akwamuhene who wields significant power. This also amply demonstrates why the Akwamus are scattered all over Ghana.

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    Akwamus expansion started between 1629 and 1710 and this took them to places like the whole Akuapem area including Kyerepon and Larteh, Denkyera, Ga-Adangbe, the Ladoku states of Agona, Winneba, Afram plains, Southern Togoland and finally Ouidah in present Benin. The powerful king Nana Ansa Sasraku l annexed the Guans and took over the traditional areas of the Kyerepons and ruled over them until Asonaba Nana Ofori Kuma and his followers after a succession dispute in their effort to form their own State engaged them in a fierce war after which the Akwamus were driven away from the mountains.

    These Asona family members and their followers then were given a piece of land from the original settlers the Guans, Kyerepons, to form the Akuapem state. However, most of the present Akuapems still have their roots at Akwamufie especially those bearing the names Addo and Akoto or from the Aduana family.

    Nana Ansa Sasraku also played an important role in the life of the King Osei Tutu of Asante. He protected him from the Denkyiras and when he was called to take over the Kwaaman stool Nana Ansa Sasraku provided him with 300 Asafomen from Akwamu to guide him to Kwaaman. When Nana Osei Tutu arrived, he gave all the men to Kwaaman Asafohene and they became citizens of Asafo and that won the Kumase Asafohene the title Akwamuhene of Kumase. According to oral tradition, the whole structure of the Asante army that was started by Nana Osei Kofi Tutu l and helped the Asantes through many wars, was a replicate of the well organised Akwamu army. The Akwamus developed a peculiar military maneuver termed “the three fold approach” unknown to the rest of the people – (Adonten, Benkum, Nifa)” – the front guard; the left and right guards.

    Nana Osei Tutu was also assisted by the Anumfuo (later Adumfuo) who accompanied him from Akwamu, in execution cases. A large number of the Asantes of today originated from Akwamu especially, people from Asafo and Adum as well as sections of people from Bantama and Barekese.

    After the death of Nana Ansa Sasraku, he was succeeded by two kings collectively, Nana Addo Panin and Nana Basua. It was during this time that the Akwamus took over the possession of the Danish Castle at Christianborg or Osu.

    Because of the cordial relationship that existed between Akwamu and Asante, during the 19th century expansion of Asante, the Akwamu unlike most states after war, was never annexed by the Asantes. That is the reason why during the Golden Anniversary of Nana Kwafo Akoto ll Nana Opoku Ware ll crossed the Pra river to spend two days at Akwamufie.

     

    At the peak of their power the Akwamu state had embraced much of the Eastern part of the Gold Coast and traditionally Between 1677 and 1681 the Akwamu state conquered the states of Ladoku, Agona and Whydah as well as the Ewe people of the Ho region. The Akwamu also conquered the Ga people and occupied the old Ga Kingdom.

     

    In 1693, Asomani of Akwamu lead a raid and seized Osu Castle (currently the seat of the Ghanaian government), from the Danish colonists. Akwamu thus controlled many of the trade routes from the interior to the coast in the eastern half of what is now Ghana and created a capital at Nyanoase. In the 1720s a civil war in the Akwamu state caused the state’s disintegration. Most of the King’s allies were sold away as slaves and transported to the Caribbean island of St. John. In 1733 they fomented a slave revolt there.

    In 1733 the Akwamu were over powered by a combined force of the Akuapims, Agona, Accra, Fanti and the Akyems which saw the previously illustrious empire put to an end. The Akwamu were pushed across the Volta to Akwamufie which is the location of their current capital. In the course of Akwamu migration and war escapades, some decided to stay behind and settle while the main stream continued their journey. As a result of this, the Akwamus can be found all over the country – Obomeng, Obo, Bepong, Asakraka and the entire Nifa division – of Kwahu Asamankese, Kade, Akwatia, Aburi etc; in the central region: Lower Jokwa, Abakrampa, Twifo Heming, Adonmorobe, around Cape Coast etc; in the Greater Accra Region, Otublohum, part of Osu, Pokuase etc. and in the Western Region, some areas around Nkooful etc.

     

    Akwamus expansion started between 1629 and 1710 and this took them to places like the whole Akuapem area including Kyerepon and Larteh, Denkyera, Ga-Adangbe, the Ladoku states of Agona, Winneba, Afram plains, Southern Togoland and finally Ouidah in present Benin. The powerful king Nana Ansa Sasraku l annexed the Guans and took over the traditional areas of the Kyerepons and ruled over them until Asonaba Nana Ofori Kuma and his followers after a succession dispute in their effort to form their own State engaged them in a fierce war after which the Akwamus were driven away from the mountains.

    These Asona family members and their followers then were given a piece of land from the original settlers the Guans, Kyerepons, to form the Akuapem state. However, most of the present Akuapems still have their roots at Akwamufie especially those bearing the names Addo and Akoto or from the Aduana family.

    Nana Ansa Sasraku also played an important role in the life of the King Osei Tutu of Asante. He protected him from the Denkyiras and when he was called to take over the Kwaaman stool Nana Ansa Sasraku provided him with 300 Asafomen from Akwamu to guide him to Kwaaman. When Nana Osei Tutu arrived, he gave all the men to Kwaaman Asafohene and they became citizens of Asafo and that won the Kumase Asafohene the title Akwamuhene of Kumase. According to oral tradition, the whole structure of the Asante army that was started by Nana Osei Kofi Tutu l and helped the Asantes through many wars, was a replicate of the well organised Akwamu army. The Akwamus developed a peculiar military maneuver termed “the three fold approach” unknown to the rest of the people – (Adonten, Benkum, Nifa)” – the front guard; the left and right guards.

    Nana Osei Tutu was also assisted by the Anumfuo (later Adumfuo) who accompanied him from Akwamu, in execution cases. A large number of the Asantes of today originated from Akwamu especially, people from Asafo and Adum as well as sections of people from Bantama and Barekese.

    After the death of Nana Ansa Sasraku, he was succeeded by two kings collectively, Nana Addo Panin and Nana Basua. It was during this time that the Akwamus took over the possession of the Danish Castle at Christianborg or Osu.

    Because of the cordial relationship that existed between Akwamu and Asante, during the 19th century expansion of Asante, the Akwamu unlike most states after war, was never annexed by the Asantes. That is the reason why during the Golden Anniversary of Nana Kwafo Akoto ll Nana Opoku Ware ll crossed the Pra river to spend two days at Akwamufie.

     

    At the peak of their power the Akwamu state had embraced much of the Eastern part of the Gold Coast and traditionally Between 1677 and 1681 the Akwamu state conquered the states of Ladoku, Agona and Whydah as well as the Ewe people of the Ho region. The Akwamu also conquered the Ga people and occupied the old Ga Kingdom.

     

    In 1693, Asomani of Akwamu lead a raid and seized Osu Castle (currently the seat of the Ghanaian government), from the Danish colonists. Akwamu thus controlled many of the trade routes from the interior to the coast in the eastern half of what is now Ghana and created a capital at Nyanoase. In the 1720s a civil war in the Akwamu state caused the state’s disintegration. Most of the King’s allies were sold away as slaves and transported to the Caribbean island of St. John. In 1733 they fomented a slave revolt there.

    In 1733 the Akwamu were over powered by a combined force of the Akuapims, Agona, Accra, Fanti and the Akyems which saw the previously illustrious empire put to an end. The Akwamu were pushed across the Volta to Akwamufie which is the location of their current capital. In the course of Akwamu migration and war escapades, some decided to stay behind and settle while the main stream continued their journey. As a result of this, the Akwamus can be found all over the country – Obomeng, Obo, Bepong, Asakraka and the entire Nifa division – of Kwahu Asamankese, Kade, Akwatia, Aburi etc; in the central region: Lower Jokwa, Abakrampa, Twifo Heming, Adonmorobe, around Cape Coast etc; in the Greater Accra Region, Otublohum, part of Osu, Pokuase etc. and in the Western Region, some areas around Nkooful etc.

  • AKWAMU REGAL LIST

    1. 1. OTUMFOU AGYEN KOKOBO……………..…….………..1505-1520
    2. OTUMFOU OFOSU KWABI………………………….…….1520-1535
    3. OTUMFOU ODURO…………………………………….…….1535-1550
    4. OTUMFOU ADDOW………………………………..……….1550-1565
    5. OTUMFOU AKOTO I………………………………………..1565-1580
    6. OTUMFOU ASARE…………………………………………..1580-1595
    7. OTUMFOU AKOTIA…………………………………………1595-1610
    8. OTUMFOU OBUOKO DAKO……………………………..1610-1625
    9. OHEMAA AFRAKOMA I …………………………………..1625-1640
    10. OTUMFOU ANSA SASRAKU I……………………………1640-1674
    11. OTUMFOU ANSA SASRAKU II…………………………..1674-1689
    12. OTUMFOU ANSA SASRAKU III…………………………1689-1699
    13. OTUMFOU ANSA SASRAKU IV(ADDO)…………….1699-1702
    14. OTUMFOU AKONNO PANYIN……………………………1702-1725
    15. OTUMFOU ANSA KWAO……………………………………1725-1730
    16. OTUMFOU AKONNO KUMA (REGENT)………………1730-1744
    17. OTUMFOU OPOKU KUMA…………………………………1744-1747
    18. OTUMFOU DARKO YAW PANYIN………………………1747-1781
    19. OTUMFOU AKOTO PANYIN……………………..………..1781-1835
    20. OTUMFOU DARKO YAW KUMA………………………….1835-1866
    21. OTUMFOU KWAFO AKOTO I (OKOFOROBOO)………..1866-1882
    22. OTUMFOU AKOTO ABABIO (KWAME KENSEN)………..1882-1887
    23. OTUMFOU AKOTO ABABIO II (OKRA AKOTO)…………..1887-1909
    24. OTUMFOU AKOTO KWADWO (MENSA WOOD)…………..1909-1910
    25. OTUMFOU AKOTO ABABIO III (EMML.ASARE)…………..1910-1917
    26. OTUMFOU ANSA SASRAKU IIII (KWABENA DAPAA)…..1917-1921
    27. OTUMFOU AKOTO ABABIO IIII (EMML.ASARE)…………..1921-1937
    28. ODENEHO KWAFO AKOTO II (KWAME OFEI)……………….1937-1992
  • NO. NAME OF CHIEF STATUS TOWN GAZATTED
    1.        NANA YAW BOADU IV KYIDOMHENE/ ACTING PRESIDENT AKWAMUFIE YES
    2.        NANA AFRAKOMA II PARAMOUNT QUEENMOTHER AKWAMUFIE YES
    3.        NANA BOATENG DEBRA V ADONTENHENE APEGUSO YES
    4.        NANA BOAFO ADDO II ABOABOHENE ABOABO YES
    5.        NANA KWASI OKONA IV TWIDANHENE AKWAMUFIE YES
    6.        NANA ASARE AKOWUAH III KRONTIHENE POWMU YES
    7.        NANA BOAFO ANSAH PREM IV AKOSOMBOHENE AKOSOMBO YES
    8.        NANA KWASI ANSAH III APENKWAHENE APENKWA YES
    9.        NANA YAA ASAA SAFOA II OSOMANYAWAHEMAA AKWAMUFIE YES
    10.    NANA AKOTO DARKO III FOTOSANFOHENE AKWAMUFIE YES
    11.    NANA OKRUKATA V NEW AKRADEHENE NEW AKRADE YES
    12.    NANA KOFI BAMFORO V KOROPEIHENE KOTROPEI YES
    13.    NANA OTEIKU ASARE AMOANI III APAASOHENE APAASO YES
    14.    NANA OSAE NYAMPONG IV PESSEHENE PESSE YES
    15.    NANA ANSAH OKOMANHENE III BENKUM KYEAME AKWAMUFIE YES
    16.    NANA AGYEMANG MEREKU III NNUDUHENE NNUDU YES
    17.    NANA GYANSARE V PIANKOHEHE AKWAMUFIE YES
    18.    NANA KWADWO AWERE II WERENPEHENE AKWAMUFIE YES
    19.    NANA ANSAH KWAO IV ADUMASAHENE ADUMASA YES
    20.    NANA APPIAH-NTI III APPIAHKROMHENE APPIAKROM YES
    21.    NANA OTOPAH III AGONAHENE AGONA YES
    22.    BAFOUR OPONWAA II KRONTIHEMAA POWMU YES
    23.    NANA AKOSUA GYASEWA II KYIDOMHEMAA AKWAMUFIE YES
    24.    NANA AKUA ASANTEWAA II ANYENSUHEMAA ANYENSU YES
    25.    NANA KWAKU AFARI III DWENASEHENE DWENASE NO
    26.    NANA NYARKOA II BENKUMHEMAA ATIMPOKU YES
    27.    NANA SAMANKO II NEW AKRADEHEMAA NEW AKRADE YES
    28.    NANA EFFAH POARKWA II NIFAHEMAA SENCHI YES
    29.    ABEREWA OFORIWAA YARGO II ABOASAHEMAA ABOASA YES
    30.    NANA OKORWAA IV ADJENAHEMAA ADJENA NO
    31.    NANA ANIMAA III ANYASEHEMAA ANYASE YES
    32.    NANA KESSISWAA II NNUDUHEMAA NNUDU YES
    33.    NANA DOKUA III APAASOHEMAA APAASO YES
    34.    NANA AMOAKOHENE IV SANAAHENE AKWAMUFIE YES
    35.    ABEREWA OFORIWAA II SANAAHEMAA AKWAMUFIE YES
    36.    NANA AKUA ASANTEWAA III PESSEHEMAA PESSE YES
    37.    NANA GYAN ODURO DAPAA II SENCHI- ADONTEN SENCHI YES
    38.    BAFOUR DARKWA III DASAASEHENE DASAASE YES
    39.    NANA MIREKUA II DASAASEHEMAA DASAASE NO
    40.    NANA NYARKO ASARE III ADONTENG GYASEHENE APEGUSO YES
    41.    NANA KWASI TUTU IV ANYASEHENE ANYASE YES
    42.    NANA DARKOA II AKOSMBOHEMAA AKOSOMBO YES
    43.    NANA AGYAKUM III GYAKITI- MANKRADO GYEKITI YES
    44.    NANA OBESEBEA I AGONAHEMAA AGONA YES
    45.    NANA OFFEI AMOAH IV AKYEAMEPANIN OF AKWAMU AKWAMUFIE YES
    46.    NANA OFFEI OWOBIE V ANYANSU- ODIKRO ANYENSU YES
    47.    NANA ADU ASANTE III ADOMIHENE ADOMI NO
    48.    ABEREWA KWABEA III ANKOBEAHERMAA AKWAMUFIE YES
    49.    NANA GYAMFA III GYAKITIHEMAA GYAKITI YES
    50.    NANA ADWOA ODURAA III ADONTENHEMAA APEGUSO YES
    51.    NANA AGYAKWABEA ACHEAMPOMAA II SAKYIKROMHEMAA SAKYIKROM YES
    52.    NANA MAMFE OTUABENG III GYAKITIHENE GYAKITI YES

     

     

  • OUR TOWN
  • HISTORIC ACHIEVEMENTS
  • FUNCTIONS
  • TOWNS IN THE AKWAMU TRADITIONAL AREA

    1. AKWAMUFIE (SEAT OF TRADITIONAL AREA)
    2. NEW AKRADE
    3. OLD AKRADE
    4. SENCHI
    5. APAASO
    6. DASAASE
    7. ATIMPOKU
    8. ANYAASE
    9. KOTROPEI
    10. POWMU
    11. MANGOASE
    12. KYEASE/AKOSOMBO
    13. FRANKADUA
    14. FINTEY
    15. ADOME
    16. ADOME NKWANTA
    17. ADJENA
    18. ADUMASA
    19. GYAKITI
    20. ANYAASE
    21. NNUDU
    22. KONYARKO
    23. ABOASA
    24. APEGUSO
    25. ANYENSU
    26. MPAKADAN
    27. ASAFO
    28. APPIAHKROM
    29. PESSE
    30. AKWARTENG
    31. DWENASE
  • History Behind Osu castle & Nana Asamani.

     

    Nana Asamani, a person whose life and career present many interesting facets was Asomani (Asemmani) of Akwamu. Said to have been first employed as a cook in the English forts at Accra,’after learning the ‘white man’s ways’ he established himself as a trader at Accra, and acted as a broker for Akwamu traders who came there to trade with the Danes in Christiansburg, Later on Asomani was chosen to carry out Akwamu’s revenge on the Danes. After successfully executing his orders he became the Akwamu Governor of the castle in 1693. Akwamu-Danish estrangement had started at the end of the 1670s when the latter assisted the Accra to foil an Akwamu attack on them. The Danes were never forgiven by the Akwamu; and in 1693 Asomani, who was familiar with their strength and weakness, led a group of eighty Akwamu men into the castle. The Akwamu deceived the Danes into believing that they had come to purchase firearms. By a clever ruse they were able to load the guns with bullets which had been “concealed in the folds of their cloths’. Their guns were quickly turned on the Danes, who soon surrendered; the Danish Governor escaped, but his less fortunate countrymen were led captives to Akwamu.

     

    Asomani, now Governor of Christiansburg Castle, did all he could to induce European traders to accept the change of ownership by extending his friendship to all traders, not excluding interlopers. He saluted all ships which approached his castle ‘with his cannon. Captain Phillip, who dined with him in 1693, seems to have been much impressed by his comportment and his hospitality. Although his attempts to behave like the Danish Governor lent a ludicrous impression to his behaviour, he did what, in the circumstances of the time, he considered best.

     

    At dinner, instead of dressing as an Akwamu representative, Asomani is said to have donned the full dress of a Danish Governor. But while the new Governor was immensely enjoying the duties and rights of his new role, negotiations which were going on between the Akwamu capital and the Dutch were soon to deprive him of his position of honour.

     

    In August 1693 the Dutch at Elmina asked the agents at Accra to investigate the possibilities of the sale of Christiansburg Castle by Akwamu, and promised to fulfill all the former obligations of the Danes, namely, to pay the requisite rent. But the Akwamu king, Basua, would not part with his new acquisition; the furthest he would go was to allow the Danish captives in Akwamu to be ransomed, and to promise not to sell the castle to any European nation other than the Danes and the Dutch. I At least, however, Basua allowed himself to be persuaded into returning the castle to the Danes. In addition to the booty of goods and gold valued at about £1,600 sterling, the ransom price of the captives, the Akwamu capture of the castle brought over 100 marks of gold into the national treasury. Although the successful negotiation for the return of the castle ended Asomani’s career as the Akwamu Governor, it was by no means the end of his active life on the coast.

     

News

Onua FM Gyakiti Easter

Easter celebration in the Akwamu area of the Eastern Region was this year taken to another level as Accra-based local radio station Onua FM joined hundreds of revelers in and around the area for a four-day jam-packed event.

In a year that the overhyped Kwahu Easter festival saw a dip in patronage, the Onua FM Gyakiti Easter Festival attracted relatively high patronage, at least considering the fact that the event is still in its infant stage; two years old.


For four days, Gyakiti was on lockdown with happy people, good music, musical and dance performances, beach party and sumptuous local foods.

Not even the remoteness of Gyakiti in the Asuogyaman District, which is about 40 minutes drive from Akosombo, as well as the dusty nature of the road to the town could deter holidaymakers from joining the Onua FM Easter train to the place.

Upbeat about the exciting experience Gyakiti had to offer following the involvement of Onua FM and the successes of last year’s event, hundreds of revelers made the town the nerve-centre of Easter celebrations from Easter Friday to Easter Monday.

The four-day event kick-started with the Onua FM Gyakiti Easter train from Accra on Friday, March 30 dishing out great music and goodies to enthusiastic crowds at Somanya, Kpong, Atimpoku, Akosombo and Adumasa.

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